Release of Asia Institute intern John Kim’s report “A Study on Eco-friendly Development Theory”

John Kim’s recently completed his internship at the Asia Institute for the period of August 1 – September 28, 2020 and presented a thoughtful report on South Korea’s environmental policy and the specific challenges that it faces today while taking a distinctly international perspective that reflects well his global experience. Included for your reference is John Kim’s report (Powerpoint)  “A Study on Eco-friendly Development Theory,” eco-friendly development theory a concise and persuasive analysis of the challenges that climate change poses to humanity that also presents statistics from reliable sources that allows to reader to understand how Korean, and global, policy responses have evolved to meet increasing challenges.

 


“The Intersection of Climate Change and Security” (Video)

The Asia Institute & Foreign Policy in Focus

“The Intersection of Climate Change and Security”

asia institute fpif climatechange

 

 

 

 

 

Larry Wilkerson
Distinguished Adjunct Professor of Government and Public Policy,
Department of Government
William & Mary College
Alice Hill
Senior fellow for climate change policy
Council on Foreign Relations

Emanuel Pastreich
Director
The Asia Institute

 

Moderator:

John Feffer

Director, Foreign Policy in Focus

Climate Change and Security

The world faces two grave threats: nuclear war and climate change. The Trump administration has ended four decades of U.S. efforts to reduce the threat of nuclear war, withdrawing from the INF Treaty and preparing to deploy nuclear weapons around the world. At the same time, it denies the existence of climate change and supports leaders around the world who are laying waste to the environment.

But another security policy is possible, and necessary, right now. This seminar sponsored by the Asia Institute and Foreign Policy in Focus, will explore how the US could seize the initiative on arms control and link it to a global rethinking of security in light of climate change.


“The Intersection of Climate Change and Security” Asia Institute seminar

 

The Asia Institute

&

Foreign Policy in Focus

 

Panel Discussion

 

“The Intersection of Climate Change and Security”

Wednesday, December 11

4:00 pm – 5:30 pm

@ Institute for Policy Studies

 

The world faces two grave threats: nuclear war and climate change. The Trump administration has ended four decades of U.S. efforts to reduce the threat of nuclear war, withdrawing from the INF Treaty and preparing to deploy nuclear weapons around the world. At the same time, it denies the existence of climate change and supports leaders around the world who are laying waste to the environment.

But another security policy is possible, and necessary, right now. This seminar will explore how the US could seize the initiative on arms control and link it to a global rethinking of security in light of climate change.

Discussants:

  • Larry Wilkerson, Distinguished Adjunct Professor of Government and Public Policy, Department of Government at William & Mary College
  • Alice Hill, Senior fellow for climate change policy, Council on Foreign Relations
  • Emanuel Pastreich, Director, The Asia Institute
  •  

Moderator:

        John Feffer, Director, Foreign Policy in Focus

 

 

Open to the public. Preregistration not required.

Location:

 

Institute for Policy Studies

1301 Connecticut Avenue, NW, 6th Floor
Washington, DC 20036 

Phone:

2022349382

 

 

https://ips-dc.org/events/the-intersection-of-climate-change-and-security/


Asia Institute Seminar “The unexpected downturn in Korea-Japan relations ” Sept. 26

 

The Asia Institute

and

Institute for Policy Studies

 

“What went wrong?

The unexpected downturn in Korea-Japan relations and possible solutions” 

 

Thursday,  September 26, 2019

4:00-5:30

Institute for Policy Studies

 

 

Although the enhanced trilateral relationship between the United States, South Korea and Japan had become a popular theme in Washington over the last few years, the relations between these two countries appear to be burning up like the Amazon jungles these days. The decision of Seoul to pull out of the GSMIA (General Security of Military Information Agreement) intelligence sharing agreement with Tokyo is but the latest in a series of blows that have damaged a previously solid consensus on trade and finance between the countries. The current hostilities have taken an unexpected turn for the worse that has created a cultural and institutional crisis.

In this seminar an outstanding panel of experts will consider what might be the deeper causes of the conflict. Can the fallout be traced back primarily to memories of the past, or are larger economic and geopolitical shifts primary? How far will the split go, and how is it tied to similar conflicts that are arising around the world as part of the great unraveling of established institutions and shared values?

Finally, we will consider what possible approaches there are might be for building a new consensus between these two countries, and in the region, so that we can move forward by diplomatic sublation.

Please join us for this seminar cosponsored by the Asia Institute and Foreign Policy in Focus. Your insights will be welcome.

 

SPEAKERS:

 

John Feffer

Director

Foreign Policy in Focus

 

Jenny Town

Managing Editor

38 North

Stimson Center

Stephen Costello

CEO

Asia East

Moderated by

 

Emanuel Pastreich

Director

The Asia Institute

 

 

4:00-5:30 PM Thursday, September 26, 2019 @ Institute for Policy Studies (6th floor)

1301 Connecticut Ave. NW, Suite 600
Washington, DC 20036

 

 

 

 


“Prime Minister Modi’s visit to Seoul and the future of the Korean Peace Process” Seminar February 11, 2019

                 Asia Institute  Seminar

Seminar_series_Logo1_Color

“Prime Minister Modi’s visit to Seoul and the future of the Korean Peace Process”

Prof. Lakhvinder Singh
Director
Korea Peace Program

Prof Emanuel Pastreich
President
The Asia Institute (Vice President, University of Brain Education)

Monday February 11, 2019
Time: 7-8:30 PM
Venue: The Commons Foundation

The award of the Seoul Peace Prize to India’s Prime Minister Modi suggests a new expansion of the discourse on peacebuilding on the Korean peninsula as part of a larger global effort. PM Modi’s visit to Seoul immediately before the Trump-Kim Summit in Danang is rapidly taking on tremendous geopolitical significance.
How might this occasion expand Indian engagement on the Korean peninsula and what directions might such engagement go. Although India has been a passive player on the Korean peninsula, it has a tremendous tradition of promoting global peace dating back to Gandhi, and before.

As a nation that has much experience with geopolitical complexities, but has objectivity relative to the issues in Northeast Asia, might India be able to offer a new perspective?

This seminar will consider concrete fields for cooperation where India can play more active on peacebuilding under the leadership of Modi.

commons foundation